How To Close An Interview To Land The Job

Going for an interview to land your dream job can get a little disorienting. Even if it isn’t your first time, time constraints, the nature of the job and many other factors can send shivers down your spine. But don’t you worry, we understand the fear that accompanies landing your dream job and that is exactly why we have coupled these tips to help you smash that interview!

  • Begin With A Five-Point Agenda

The five-point agenda is a hiring strategy created to focus on the needs of the employer and the job to be done. The five-point agenda is a predetermined analysis in which you select your five most marketable points and repeatedly illustrate these points throughout the interview process. It is this repetition and reiteration of exactly how you’ll meet her needs that allows the employer to remember something about you.

  • Create Your 60-Second Sell 

The 60-second sell allows you to summarize your most marketable strengths briefly and concisely. Successful job hunters have found the 60-second sell:

• Was effective in capturing the employer’s attention.

• Provided excellent, concise answers to tricky questions.

• Was very easy to use.

• It was a memorable way to end an interview.

The 60-second sell is a 60-second statement that you customize for each interview, and that summarizes and links together with your five-point agenda. You will want to put the points of your five-point agenda into an order that allows you to present them in the most logical and effective manner. When you link the ideas into sentences, they should be said in 60 seconds or less. Once memorized, this statement will be easy for you to recall and use to close the interview. 

  • The Formula: Creating Your Strategy 

Examine your previous experience. Write out the key responsibilities for each job you’ve held. Note any special accomplishments. Zero in on your essential work strengths—those abilities where you excel and are most productive. 

Check with your contacts and use your network to get as much background as possible about the employer, the company, and the position’s needs. Many times, your contacts will point out the very aspects that must make up your five-point agenda. Other times, there will be little information available, and you will need to guess based on your general knowledge about performing the job. 

After reviewing the employer’s and position’s needs, determine which of your abilities and which aspects of your experience will be most relevant to the employer. Then create your five-point agenda, selecting each point to build a robust picture emphasizing how you can do the best job.

Read more on Forbes.

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